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Area in the Andes where the airplane crashed
Introduction
 
On 13 October 1972, in the central region of the Andes located between Argentina and Chile, an airplane carrying forty-five people crashed due to a navigation error. Seventy-two days after the crash, two young survivors appeared on the banks of the Andean mountain river Azufre, just when everyone had lost hope and had given up searching for the plane and its survivors.
 
This odyssey became known throughout the press as the 'Miracle in the Andes'. Books were written about the tragedy (e.g. “The Snow Society” by Pablo Vierci, and “The Andes Tragedy” by Piers Paul Read) and a documentary was also produced.

A summary of the story of the tragedy can also be found on Wikipedia.  
 

 


Lost in the Andes!
Lost in the AndesBackground
Exercises
Exercise 1: The Andean regionExercise 2: Vegetation cover (NDVI) (for university students)Exercise 3: The geographical setting of the accidentExercise 4: The route back to civilisationExercise 5: Expedition “Alive!”Exercise 6: A multidisciplinary workshop
Eduspace - Software
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Eduspace - Download
Lost_in_the_Andes.zip
More on the Andes tragedy
Wikipedia summary
 
 
 
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