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Rosetta calls home
Rosetta calls home

Rosetta phones home

22 January 2014
It was a fairy-tale ending to an important chapter in the story of the Rosetta space mission as ESA heard from its distant spacecraft for the first time in 31 months.

On 20 January, Rosetta’s pre-programmed internal ‘alarm clock’ woke up the spacecraft. After warming up its key navigation instruments, Rosetta sent a signal to let mission operators know it had survived the most distant part of its journey.

Rosetta is chasing Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, where it will become the first space mission to rendezvous with a comet, the first to attempt a landing on a comet’s surface, and the first to follow a comet as it swings around the Sun.

Since its launch in 2004, Rosetta has made three flybys of Earth and one of Mars to help it on course to its rendezvous with 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, encountering asteroids Steins and Lutetia along the way.

Rosetta and Philae at comet
Rosetta and Philae at comet
Operating on solar energy alone, Rosetta was placed into a deep space ‘sleep’ in June 2011 as it cruised out to a distance of nearly 800 million km from the warmth of the Sun, beyond the orbit of Jupiter.

Comets are considered the primitive building blocks of the Solar System and likely helped to ‘seed’ Earth with water, perhaps even the ingredients for life. But many fundamental questions about these objects remain, and through its comprehensive study of Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, Rosetta aims to unlock the secrets contained within.

Rosetta’s first images of 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko are expected in May, when the spacecraft is still 2 million km from its target. Towards the end of May, the spacecraft will execute a major manoeuvre to line up for its critical rendezvous with the comet in August.

After rendezvous, Rosetta will start with two months of extensive mapping of the comet’s surface, and will also make important measurements of the comet’s gravity, mass and shape, and assess its atmosphere.

Using these data, scientists will choose a landing site for the mission’s 100 kg Philae probe. The landing is currently scheduled for 11 November and will be the first time that a landing on a comet has ever been attempted!

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